June 2012


Clugston_Warm_Springs

Jean Clugston and Barbara Mason

Ebb & Flow

Jun 6, 2012 – Jul 1, 2012

Preview Reception: June 6, 5-8 pm
First Thursday Reception, June 7, 6-9pm
Artist’s Talk, June 16, 11am

In the month of June, Waterstone Gallery is excited to present, Ebb and Flow, featuring gallery artists Jean Clugston and Barabara Mason, along with Barbara’s guests, Poet Paulann Petersen and bookbinder Laurie Weiss.

Jean Clugston’s paintings at first seem to be mystical abstractions until the clarity of the waterways appears, then recedes into a defined distance. The reflective quality of water mirrors its surroundings, though the image may be fractured and distorted by surface ripples. The reflection is intertwined with what lies below the surface. The multiple, transparent layers of color, artifacts of previous stratum, revive random marks and ghost trails left behind by squeegee and brayer. This evidence of process is the key to the final richness.

Some of the paintings make recognizable reference to the artist’s travels to Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon; Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana; Lake Chapla, Mexico. Others leave the viewer unmoored, searching for horizon or shoreline. These ethereal oils redefine the bounds of conventional landscape painting, opening into the inner waterways.

A completely hand-made artists’ book in a limited edition of 50 copies, Dark River of Stars is the collaboration of three Northwest artists: printmaker Barbara Mason, Oregon Poet Laureate Paulann Petersen and bookbinder Laurie Weiss.  Poems collected in this volume were gifts the poet sent out individually each Valentine’s Day to friends and family over a period of nine years.  The book’s title is taken from a line in one of the poems. It is a metaphor for a signature, for the uniqueness of each human sensibility. The book’s etchings are hand-printed, using solarplates. Its pages are drum-leafed, case-bound, and presented in a protective case.  The imagery is abstract, but supports the text. Several pages are individually framed as broadleafs. This book is an art object in itself, but also a volume of amazing poetry.